Keeping Kids Warm in Winter

Gear you need to keep kids warm!

15 Things to Do in Calgary This Winter

Winter fun in Calgary from skiing and tubing to ice falls and festivals!

14 Things to Do in Canmore This Winter

With canyon ice walks, world class cross country skiing, dogsledding, and more, Canmore is a winter adventure playground!

10 Things to Do in Banff This Winter

Ski, skate, hike, or snowshoe, then hit the hot springs and dine in town!

9 Things to Do in Lake Louise This Winter

The Ice Magic Festival is amazing, but there's so much more to do in Lake Louise!

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Prairie View Trail, Bow Valley Provincial Park

Prairie View Trail is a popular spring/fall conditioner due to its proximity to Calgary and snow-free conditions early/late in hiking season. Hike up the old forestry road to McConnell Ridge for beautiful views of Barrier Lake, Mount Baldy and beyond. From here, you can scramble up a rock outcrop to a higher viewpoint or continue on to Barrier Lake Fire Lookout where you can look out over the Bow Valley.  After, stop at Chief Chiniki Village for a treat!


Trip Report

The wind was howling, as it often does at Barrier Lake, but the girls couldn't resist throwing rocks in the turquoise water. They asked, "Do you remember our beach day?" and made us promise to bring them back on a warmer day to play in the sand. With rosy cheeks and numb fingers, we said farewell to the lake and followed the beaten path up to the lookout.

Barrier Lake
Trembling aspens gave way to conifers as we wound our way ever upwards. We looked for lichens, mosses, and faces on the many trees we met and listened to the wind. At times it sounded like the ocean!

Take either fork - they rejoin a short ways down the trail
Take the left fork here
Right before the ridge, the trail gets quite steep, but the girls were motivated to reach the ridge and have a treat. As the trees cleared, we could see the lake below and all the surrounding peaks! Whiskeyjacks rode the thermals in the golden glow and dive bombed for crumbs (left by hikers); they were really fun to watch.

McConnell Ridge
We were losing daylight, so we decided to clamber up to the viewpoint for a quick look and save the Fire Lookout for another day. The short detour was well worth the extra couple minutes! 

Choose your own adventure: path on the right or scramble up the rocks at centre
Option 3 to get up to the lookout: harder scramble
(NOT the official trail)
View from McConnell Ridge Viewpoint
Looking towards Mount Baldy from McConnell Ridge Viewpoint
After more snacks (chocolate for the win!), the girls fairly flew down the mountain. It was a great half-day outing with gorgeous views from the top! 

Chasing the last light of day

Prairieview Trail at a Glance

Distance: 13.2 km return (Add on 0.7 km one way to the Fire Lookout).
Elevation Gain: 421 m elevation gain to McConnell Ridge (Add 100 m to the Fire Lookout)
Washrooms? Outhouses at parking lot
Stroller Friendly? No
Directions from Calgary: Head west on Highway 1. Take the Highway 40S/Kananaskis Trail exit. At the top of the ramp, turn left at the stop sign. Continue for 12 km. AFTER Barrier Lake Information Centre, turn right at Barrier Dam Day Use.
Parking: Barrier Dam Day Use Area
Trailhead: The trailhead is at the northwest corner of the parking lot.

Barrier Lake Fire Lookout

Know Before You Go

  • Ice cleats or microspikes are recommended from late fall to late spring. 
  • The trail is for hiking and mountain biking. Please share the trail.
  • As this trail is in a provincial park, dogs must be on leash at all times.
  • For a longer hike and chance to see a small waterfall, you can make a loop with Jewell Creek/Falls.
  • There are garbage cans at the trailhead only. Please pack out all trash.

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Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Yukon Charlie's Elite SPIN Snowshoes: Review And Giveaway

Over the years, I've tried several kinds of snowshoes from old school rawhide and wood (my grandfather's) to the most modern and innovative. This seemingly simple mode of transportation is constantly being reinvented with different shapes, bindings, and materials for convenience and comfort. The newest snowshoes are nothing like my grandfather's snowshoes and that's a good thing!

For mountain snowshoeing, I like backcountry snowshoes with aggressive traction, heel risers, and bindings that stay put. I also look for women-specific models which are narrower to allow for a natural gait. Narrower women's snowshoes are lighter too! Double bonus!! While most backcountry snowshoes will set you back about $300 or more, it is possible to get really good ones for around $200 as we've seen with the Yukon Charlie's Elite SPIN snowshoes.

The Yukon Charlie's Elite SPIN backcountry series snowshoes have rocker aluminum frames with attractive decking, Mountain Claw crampons, heel risers, and Northwave SPIN (dial) bindings all at an affordable price. In this gear review, we'll share our experience with them and what we love about them!

Spoiler Alert: The Yukon Charlie's Elite SPIN are the most attractive snowshoes we own and their bindings are the bomb!


<<Scroll down to enter to win a pair of these snowshoes!>>

Testing 

My husband and I have been testing the Elite SPIN snowshoes (regular and women's versions respectively) for over two months. We've used them on packed snow with icy patches as well as deep powder on easy to moderate terrain. They have performed well and required no maintenance. 

Testing snowshoes is a tough job, but someone's gotta do it! ;)

What We Love 

Amazing Bindings

Our favorite thing about the Elite SPIN snowshoes is their Northwave SPIN bindings with toe boxes. Cyclists and snowboarders will recognize the Northwave name. If you're not familiar, I can tell you that these dial bindings are top notch and easy to use. Simply spin the dial to tighten the bindings (tighten the heel strap first). To remove the snowshoes, pull the toggle on the top of your snowshoe to instantly open the SPIN dial and free your toes, then loosen the heel strap. It's so easy, I can do it with thick mittens on!! This is a huge plus if you have Raynaud's like me, or have gotten cold hands fussing with your kids' hats, mitts, boots, and snowshoes in -15 (why can't they keep their stuff on?!?). Besides being incredibly easy to use, the SPIN dial also means you can make microadjustments for the perfect fit.

The bindings were extremely comfortable and stayed securely fastened in all conditions while the toe boxes and foot pads kept our feet properly positioned.

Side note: While it sounds like the snowshoes are simply doing what they should, it's important to note that other snowshoes we've tried had problematic or finicky bindings that did not stay fastened or were hard to fasten/unfasten. We really enjoyed how easy the SPIN bindings were to use!


Yukon Charlie's Elite SPIN Snowshoes
Frame

Intended for backcountry use, the 6000 aluminum frame is the "strongest and most torsionally rigid frame" Yukon Charlie's has ever offered. Surprisingly, these rugged snowshoes weigh little more (4-5 oz) than backcountry snowshoes that cost over $100 more! (If you are looking for ultralight snowshoes to run in, check out Yukon Charlie's Race Ultra-Lite Snowshoes! Only 2.5 lbs per pair!)

The rocker shape (turned up tips and tails) and Free Flex axle system allows for a more natural gait, so you can walk comfortably and easily in your snowshoes. We could actually notice a difference between our other snowshoes which are quite flat in comparison and liked the momentum and agility the rocker shape provided! Although the tails are turned up, they do not collect and flip up snow as we expected, but I still recommend wearing shell/snow pants when snowshoeing so you can have fun in the snow without getting cold. Half the fun of snowshoeing is lying in the snow and making snow angels!

The integrated heel lift is easy to engage and reduces the burn in your calves when climbing uphill. Check out how in this quick 8 second video here!

Minimal snow kicked up after one hour of snowshoeing
(in packed snow and powder)

Crampons

The Mountain Claw crampons have lots of teeth to grip ice and snow. We found the traction to be great whether we were on packed snow or icy sections of the trail. We have yet to test the snowshoes on super steep inclines, but on moderate hills with packed snow/slush/powder/icy sections, I felt confident and sure footed.

Decking

The lightweight decking sheds snow so you don't carry extra weight and looks good too. My husband says these are the most attractive snowshoes he's ever had and I agree!

Yukon Charlie's Elite SPIN Snowshoes
Women's on left; Men's on right (weird camera angle - the women's are narrower!)
Women's Version vs. Men's Version

The women's and men's Elite SPIN snowshoes have the same main features, but when it comes to size and shape, they are quite different. The women's snowshoes are narrower, more angular, and thereby lighter. At 120 pounds, I get good flotation from the 8x21" women's snowshoes. My husband is 150 pounds and found the men's 8x25" snowshoes to work well for him. When selecting your size, be sure to take into account your outer wear and pack weight so you get adequate flotation.

Women's Elite Spin Snowshoe Dimensions and Weight: 
  • The 8x21" are 3.8 pounds; for snowshoers up to 150 pounds.
  • The 8x25" are 4 pounds; for snowshoers up to 200 pounds.

Men's Elite Spin Snowshoe Dimensions and Weight: 
  • The 8x25" are 4.2 pounds; for snowshoers up to 200 pounds.
  • The 9x30" are 4.8 pounds; for snowshoers up to 250 pounds.
Yukon Charlie's Elite SPIN Snowshoes - Women's

What could be better 

I'd love to see an ultralight version of these snowshoes with the Northwave spin bindings, but realize this would drive up the price.

Verdict 

The Yukon Charlie's Elite Spin Snowshoes are attractive, yet rugged, snowshoes with a rocker frame, integrated heel lifts, and innovative bindings that make for comfortable snowshoeing. At their price point, they offer an amazing value!

Yukon Charlie's Elite SPIN - Women's Snowshoes with Carbon Trekking Poles

Where to Buy

Purchase from Yukon Charlie's, Amazon.ca (affiliate link - no extra charge to you - thanks for your support), or select retailers. You can often find certain Yukon Charlie's snowshoes at Costco for a great deal, so it's worth checking there first!

Disclosure

Yukon Charlie's generously provided my family with Elite SPIN and kids' snowshoes to test and review as part of our Brand Ambassador kit. As always, all words and opinions are my own.

These snowshoes make you wanna JUMP, JUMP!!

Giveaway

Now is your chance to win a pair of snowshoes! I have one pair of Yukon Charlie's Elite SPIN for Women Snowshoes, size 8x25", color: blue for one lucky reader in Canada. Please complete the Rafflecopter form below. Shipping is within Canada only. Contest closes March 16, 2017 at 12 am MST.

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Safety moment: When snowshoeing, be sure to pack the 10 essential systems, avoid avalanche terrain, and check the thickness of natural ice before venturing on it. Read Why You Need Avalanche Skills Training and Pond and Lake Ice Safety for more information.

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Ribbon Creek Snowshoe Trail, Kananaskis

Ribbon Creek Trail, near Kananaskis Village, is the perfect family snowshoe trail with views, bridges, and minimal elevation gain. Starting from Ribbon Creek parking lot, follow the orange snowshoe trail markers west. The trail winds along the creek, occasionally crossing it, affording great views of Ribbon Peak and Mount Allan. My girls' favorite thing was troll hunting at the numerous bridges (5 in the 1st kilometre!), going off trail, and shaking snow off the trees! And going for treats at Moose Family Kitchen in the Village! You don't have to do the whole trail to enjoy the beauty of the area as the whole trail is scenic.

Ribbon Creek Snowshoe Trail at a Glance

Distance: 3.3 km one way. Return the way you came.
Elevation Gain: 60 m
Washrooms? Pit toilets at parking lot
Chariot Friendly? Only if there is lots of snow. One bridge in the first kilometre has stairs leading up to it.
Distance from Calgary: 98 km
Parking: Ribbon Creek Day Use Area 
Trailhead: West end of Ribbon Creek Day Use Area 

Ribbon Creek Snowshoe Trail
Ribbon Creek Snowshoe Trail

Meadow View on Ribbon Creek Snowshoe Trail

Know Before You Go

  • There is avalanche danger beyond the 3.3 km mark. Please return the way you came!
  • This is a multi-use trail; please watch for cyclists. After 2 km, the cross country trail joins the snowshoe trail. Hikers, snowshoers, and cyclists should yield to skiers.
Shaking trees! Too fun!

Where to Stay

Delta Kananaskis Lodge and the HI Kananaskis Wilderness Hostel are your nearest options! See my review of the Delta Kananaskis Lodge here. To book a private room at the Kananaskis Hostel, call them at (403) 591-7333.
Delta Kananaskis Lodge

Where to Eat

We love Moose Family Kitchen, a cafe adjacent to the Delta Kananaskis Lodge, in the same building as Kananaskis Outfitters. They have ramen, authentic Japanese beef bowls, as well as sandwiches, coffee, ice cream, and baked goods. 

Moose Family Kitchen Ramen
At the Delta, try Market Cafe for a quick bite, Woody's Pub and Patio for a burger, or Forte Restaurant for tasty Italian fare.

Note: Bighorn Lounge at the Delta has been torn down as a part of renovations (as of February 2017). 

Related Posts

Where to Snowshoe Near Calgary
10 Tips for Fun Family Snowshoeing
Yukon Charlie's Elite SPIN Snowshoes Review
Surviving Winter With Raynaud's
Keeping Kids Warm in Winter
Winter Activity Guide for Calgary, Banff, Canmore, Kananaskis, and Lake Louise

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

KEEN Durand Mid WP Hiking Boots Review & Giveaway

When you hike in the mountains, high quality waterproof hiking boots are essential. You cannot afford to get wet, cold feet when it drops below zero at night (typical in the Canadian Rockies in summer)! My preference is for textile and leather boots that are lightweight, comfortable, and don't require breaking in or TLC.

Of the several hiking boots I've tried, the KEEN Durands really shine. After 14 months of hikes, scrambles and backpacking trips, my Durands are still comfortable and waterproof! Read on to see what I love about them!

---SCROLL DOWN TO WIN A PAIR OF KEEN BOOTS / SHOES!---

Disclosure: KEEN Canada generously provided me with these boots and sponsored the giveaway, but all words and opinions are my own.




What I Like

The Durand Mid WP Hiking Boots are comfortable, waterproof, low maintenance, and can be worn right out of the box (no break in period). These are the main advantages of mesh and leather boots. While this type of boot isn't as durable as all leather, in my opinion, the advantages make up for the shorter lifespan. Hiking is so much more fun when you have comfortable, breathable, waterproof footwear that doesn't give you blisters!

KEEN's proprietary waterproof breathable membrane (KEEN.Dry), works extremely well to let feet breathe while keeping water out. My feet have stayed dry on creek crossings, in slush and snow, as well as in thunderstorms on multi-day trips. This means feet stay dry and you don't get blisters. They have performed as well as my boots with Gore-tex booties! Further, the waterproofing has lasted longer than a year despite me not taking good care of my boots (ideally you should clean mud/dirt off the uppers but with kids, I've gotten lazy)! KEEN actually guarantees the waterproofing for two years!

My KEEN Durands in the snow at Mount Yamnuska
The mid rise (slightly above the ankle) is perfect for hiking and short backpacking trips. Being a little taller means the boots provide ankle support and better protection from scree and pine needles, though I usually wear gaiters if I know there will be a lot of mud or scree.

The outsole made of dual compound rubber and KEEN PU "resists breakdown and compression, while preserving its shock-absorbing qualities no matter how many miles you put on them." After the all the miles I've put on mine, the soles haven't worn away at all! The flexibility of the soles is perfect for day hiking and short backpacking trips.

KEEN Durands at Lake Agnes
Best of all, when I wear these boots, my feet don't hurt. I have a bunch of issues with my feet (developing bunions, plantar fasciitis) and pronate, so I need to choose footwear that provides support and ample cushioning. The contoured heel lock and metatomical footbed help keep my feet in place to avoid hot spots and blisters, though the width of the toebox means I have to be diligent in lacing them up tight; more on that below. These boots were true to size for me (my feet are slightly wider than average), but according to the KEEN website, many people had to order a half size bigger.

Quality construction means the boots are very durable. Despite heavy use, the uppers and soles are still like new (if you look past the facade of dirt). The waterproof-breathable mesh layer is well protected by all the leather on the uppers. I foresee a few more years of adventuring in these boots!

KEEN Durands at Grassi Lakes

What I'd Like to See

I'd love to see the KEEN Durand Mid WP Boots offered in different widths, as the toe box is a bit wide for me. I was able to avoid blisters by doing the laces up tight (except for that one backpacking trip where we did 2 passes in one day and I forgot to tighten them on the descents), but feel clumsy downclimbing in them. A narrower toe box would make for better footholds when scrambling.

Features/Specifications

For a complete list of features and specs, visit KEEN Canada.

Final Verdict

The KEEN Durand Mid WP Hiking Boots are great for dayhikes and short backpacking trips in moderate terrain (for folks with average to wider feet). The rugged design and dependable waterproofing of the KEEN Durands means you will be ready for anything on your adventures!

KEEN Durands at Floe Lake Campground

Where to Buy

Buy at KEEN Canadaselect retailers, and Amazon (affiliate link).

KEEN Durand Mid WP Hiking Boots
Available on Amazon (affiliate link)

Giveaway

Now's your chance to enter to win a pair of KEEN boots or shoes from KEEN Canada!

*To be eligible, you must be a resident of Canada and complete the mandatory entries in the Rafflecopter form below. Contest closes March 8, 2017 at 12 am MST.*

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Good luck!

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Friday, February 24, 2017

Skating Fun for Little Ones

Skating is a fun, inexpensive activity the whole family can enjoy. My daughter got her first pair of skates at 1.5 years old! While she didn't skate a lot, she loved it. To make sure your first skating outings are a success, follow these tips:


  1. Bring a sled! When your little one needs a break, she can hop on the sled and have a fun ride. Seeing you and others skating will encourage her to try again. (Note: not all rinks allow sleds, so check before you go.)
    Big POG with a chair for support and Little POG in the sled
    Big POG towing Little POG on a sled at Bowness Lagoon
  2. Consider bob skates (double blades that attach to winter boots) or clip on skate supports (like skate training wheels, one brand is Skateez) for young first-time skaters. My oldest did fine with regular skates and a skating aid. My risk-averse younger daughter preferred bob skates until she was almost 5! Bob skates are very inexpensive and what I recommend for toddlers as tiny skates are expensive and usually not used many times before they are outgrown.
    Little POG (blue helmet) on bob skates at Winsport
  3. Bring a skating aid. Whether you bring a toddler chair, homemade skating aid, or store bought skating aid, your child will gain confidence from being able to skate on her own. Your back will thank you too (it's no fun bending down and holding a small child up)! *Note: Most indoor rinks can loan skating aids; some rinks do not allow them.
    Skating aids (toddler chairs work well on outdoor rinks!)
  4. Always wear a helmet. You too, parents! A hockey helmet or snow helmet is best.
    Little POG in her Nutcase Snow Helmet at Bowness Lagoon
    See my review here.
  5. Put risk-averse kids in hockey gear so falls don't hurt. My youngest was afraid to fall, so we got some second hand ringette pants for her. She was a lot braver when she had padded pants. 
  6. CCM Hockey Pants Available on Amazon (affiliate link).
  7. Play tag. Parents and older children can skate backwards to give younger kids an advantage.

  8. Play pass! As your child develops coordination, toss a stuffed animal and get your child to retrieve it, or get two kids to race to it. Stronger skaters can up their skills by kicking a ball/puck back and forth up the rink. We've even improvised with a chunk of ice when we didn't have anything to play with.
    Kicking the puck around with Dad and Uncle at Canmore Nordic Centre
  9. Dress for the cold. Warm kids are happy kids! See my story: Keeping Kids Warm in Winter for tips on what to wear. Snow pants and mittens also provide protection when kids fall.

  10. Allow time for snow play. When we go to outdoor skating rinks, about half the time is spent playing in the snow and half is spent on the rink. 
    Playing in the snow at Hawreluk Park, Edmonton
  11. Bring lots of snacks! Snacks are the other best part of skating (and hiking, biking, etc.). Things that are easy to eat with mittens on are best. Cookies and cocoa for the win!

Where to Skate

For beginners, a maintained indoor or outdoor rink is preferable to natural ice as the ice is smoother and easier to skate on. As skaters get better, they can graduate to natural ice. If you plan to skate on natural ice, please see my Pond and Lake Ice Safety Tips first.

We prefer outdoor skating rinks so we can combine skating with snow play and toboganning (and they're free!). Check out Calgary's Best Outdoor Skating Rinks for a rink near you! For places to skate in Canmore, Banff, and Lake Louise, see my Winter Activity Super Guide.

Where do you like to skate?

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Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Magical Maligne Canyon Ice Walk

Maligne Canyon, in Jasper National Park, is home to the Canadian Rockies' most spectacular and accessible ice walk. For only a few months each year, you may descend to an icy world straight out of Narnia and tread on the frozen river. As you travel through the canyon, walls of limestone rise higher on either side and grow closer together 'til you can almost touch them with arms outstretched! Stunning 30 metre tall ice falls and sparkling ice caves await in the inner recesses of the canyon. Plan to spend a few hours in this enchanting canyon. Maligne Canyon was the highlight of our trip to Jasper last March and is a winter must-see! 


Maligne Canyon Ice Walk At a Glance

When to Go: January to mid-March is usually best time. Go midweek to enjoy the falls without crowds, and check the Jasper National Park Trail Report before you go!
Distance: 4.4 km  (2.4 km hike + 2 km ice walk)
Elevation Gain: 100 m elevation gain
Time: Allow 3 hours
Nearest Washrooms: Pit toilets at the parking lot 
Stroller Friendly: No (also NOT RECOMMENDED for baby wearing due to the risk of falling on ice)
Distance From Jasper: 11 km
Parking/Trailhead: Start from Bridge 1 near the Maligne Canyon Restaurant and Gift Shop (CLOSED from October to April). Alternate start: Bridge 5 parking lot.

Magical Maligne Canyon, Jasper National Park

Route Description

See the Parks Canada Map here.

Starting from the trailhead near the restaurant, with ice cleats or microspikes on, look for little fossils just past the fossil interpretive sign. Going further, observe potholes scoured from the canyon walls by rushing water over thousands of years. Head down the stairs to First Bridge and watch your step as it's slippery!

From First Bridge, you can see ice falls. Continue on to see bigger ones! By the time you reach Second Bridge, the canyon is at its maximum depth of 50 metres.

Ice falls and potholes in Maligne Canyon, Jasper National Park
Near Third Bridge, there are several ice falls frequently visited by ice climbers. These are the ones you will visit on the canyon ice walk!
Ice Falls at Maligne Canyon, Jasper National Park
By the time you reach Fourth Bridge, the canyon has widened and the walls are less vertiginous. Stay left at the fork to stay close to the river, and watch for a canyon access sign on your left. If you get to Fifth Bridge, you've gone too far.

Maligne Canyon - Canyon Access Point
Enter at your own risk!!

Ice Walk


From the canyon access, head up the canyon back towards First Bridge. Depending on conditions, you should be able to go as far as Third Bridge (the trail is somewhat sketchy beyond with hazards overhead and underfoot). Take care on uneven and inclined surfaces and go slow to prevent slips and falls.

Near Fourth Bridge, you will notice several ice flows, including ice coming out of a cave. While it would appear that Elsa has been at work, there are several underground streams from Medicine Lake (15 km away) feeding the ice. This water rejoins Maligne River downstream later in the year.

Ice flows at Maligne Canyon
Ice cave at Maligne Canyon
Carry on to a beautiful "grotto" festooned with moss and natural ice sculptures. We could've stayed in this splashy spot all day looking for naiads, but the ice falls beckoned.

Grotto in Maligne Canyon
Natural ice sculptures, Maligne Canyon
The falls are a short walk up the canyon. They appear bigger from the riverbed, and different colors depending on how the light hits them. We spent a long time exploring in and around the falls.

Maligne Canyon Ice Falls, Jasper National Park
Maligne Canyon Ice Falls, Jasper National Park
Maligne Canyon Ice Falls, Jasper National Park
Maligne Canyon Ice Falls, Jasper National Park
Maligne Canyon Ice Falls, Jasper National Park
Maligne Canyon Ice Falls, Jasper National Park
Behind the Falls at Maligne Canyon, Jasper National Park

Turn back after the large ice falls, or if conditions look unsafe (see below).

The turnaround point - the canyon floor was collapsing


Exploring Further

Return the way you came, and continue down the river bed towards Fifth Bridge, to Wedding Cake Falls. Fed by springs, these falls do not freeze in winter.

It is another 1.6 km one way to Sixth Bridge.

Wedding Cake Falls, Maligne Canyon

Alternate (short) route

If you are short on time and just want to do the ice hike, start from Bridge 5 and head towards Bridge 4. The canyon access is between Bridge 5 & 4.

Required Gear

  • Warm, waterproof hikers
  • Microspikes or instep crampons (ice cleats not recommended as they do not do well on uneven terrain)
  • Rock/snow helmets recommended
  • Extra clothes, socks and mittens 
While the ice walk can be done unguided with proper footwear and precautions, tours offer insight into the area's history and geology, and provide you with the required safety gear. Three-hour guided tours include the use of insulated boots, trekking poles, and microspikes. The Jasper Visitor Centre can recommend local tour operators.

Know Before You Go

Hazards include, but are not limited to: rockfall, falling on ice, and falling through thin ice. Please check trail conditions before you go and be aware of your surroundings. Stay off of thin ice and watch for trees and rocks overhead that could fall into the canyon.

Trees and rocks could fall into the canyon! Be aware of your surroundings!

Fun Facts

  • Powerful forces of nature shaped this canyon over the past 10,000 years.
  • The highest parts of the canyon are 50 metres above the river!
  • The narrowest sections of the canyon are only 2 metres wide!
     Source: Parks Canada

Where to Stay

There are several accommodation options in the town of Jasper or nearby Hinton. We enjoyed Jasper Park Lodge's attractive and newly renovated rooms on our visit.

Conclusion

Maligne Canyon is a magical must-do winter walk in Jasper National Park! Put it on your bucket list!

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